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About Dr.Chloe

About Dr. Chloe

  • Holds PhD in clinical psychology from Long Island University and BA with highest honors in psychology from Columbia University.
  • Published author, experienced speaker, adjunct faculty at CUNY.
  • Yoga teacher, Buddhism student of Robert Tenzin Thurman.
  • Appearances on VH1's Love and Hip-Hop, Inside Edition, and more.
  • Heads private practice on Park Avenue in Manhattan, counseling New York City's intelligent, creative and successful residents, to manage and harness their Anxiety.
Three types of anxiety

Three types of anxiety

  • GAD — General Anxiety Disorder
    Worrying About Worrying.
  • OCD — Obsessive Compulsive Disorder
    Repetitive behavior, obsessive thoughts.
  • Panic Disorder — Sudden Onset Anxiety
    Sudden, overwhelming panic attacks.

1. GAD (Generalized Anxiety Disorder)

1. GAD
(Generalized Anxiety Disorder)

  • Bothersome to the point of wishing they could stop worrying.
  • Knowledge that worrying is not productive.
  • Worrying occurs no matter what is occupying the mind.
  • Symptoms occur for more than two months.

GAD Techniques

GAD Techniques


1A. Worry Time

  • Make a list of any and all things that are worrying you.
  • Schedule a slot in your calendar to dedicate to worrying about the topics you listed.
  • Frequency and duration of allotted "worry time" is up to you.
  • Allowing yourself this time can help you LET GO of your worries.

1A. Worry Time Example
Worry Time Example
My Worry List:
  • Household Budget
  • My Health Issues
  • Big Meeting This Week
  • Christmas Shopping
  • Want to Change Career
My Worry Time:

I will spend 30 minutes at the end of my work day worrying about my listed items, and then I will move on from that and do something else.

1A. Worry Time Homework
Practice Worry Time!

Use the form on the next slide to practice this technique,
and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
1B. Zone of Control

1B. Zone of Control

  • Dividing worries into two categories: things we CAN control, and things we CANNOT control.
  • In every situation there are factors we have control over, and factors we cannot change.
  • Write actions for each item listed as within your power to control.
  • Reflect on that which you cannot control, conciously decide to use your energy elsewhere.

1B. Zone of Control Example

Job Promotion —
What's in your control?

  • Controllable:
    ➝ Get special training or read books.
    ➝ Dress the part.
    ➝ Improve my office politics.
1B. Zone of Control Example

Job Promotion —
What's in your control?

  • Controllable:
    ➝ Get special training or read books.
    ➝ Dress the part.
    ➝ Improve my office politics.
  • Uncontrollable:
    ➝ Personal bias of selection committee.
    ➝ I am more needed in my current department.
    ➝ Other applicants may be more suited. 
1B. Zone of Control Example

Job Promotion —
What's in your control?

  • Controllable:
    ➝ Get special training or read books. ➝ LIST some books or classes.
    ➝ Dress the part. ➝ LOOK at some professional magazines.
    ➝ Improve my office politics. ➝ CHAT with three people every day.
  • Uncontrollable:
    ➝ Personal bias of selection committee.
    ➝ I am more needed in my current department.
    ➝ Other applicants may be more suited. 
1B. Zone of Control Example

Job Promotion —
What's in your control?

  • Controllable:
    ➝ Get special training or read books. ➝ LIST some books or classes.
    ➝ Dress the part. ➝ LOOK at some professional magazines.
    ➝ Improve my office politics. ➝ CHAT with three people every day.
  • Uncontrollable:
    ➝ Personal bias of selection committee.
    ➝ I am more needed in my current department.
    ➝ Other applicants may be more suited. 
1A. Zone of Control Homework
Practice Zone of Control!

Use the form on the next slide to practice this technique,
and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
1C. To-Do List With Emotions

1C. To-Do List With Emotions

  • High-functioning people often have ambitious, complex goals.
  • Listing smaller tasks induces a sense of progress and accomplishment.
  • It's important to list not only the actions required to accomplish these goals, but the accompanying emotions.
  • Listing the accompanying emotions allows you to maintain awareness of your feelings so that you can appropriately soothe them.


1C. To-Do List With Emotions Example
To-Do List With Emotions:
Component 1: Get Good GMAT Scores.
Find out target scores for my school.
Enroll in prep class.
Schedule time to study and do practice tests.
Take the GMAT.
1C. To-Do List With Emotions Example
Emotions: To-Do List With Emotions:
-- Component 1: Get Good GMAT Scores.
excitement, pressure Find out target scores for my school.
relief, comfort Enroll in prep class.
boredom, test anxiety Schedule time to study and do practice tests.
anxiety Take the GMAT.
1C. To-Do List With Emotions Example
Emotions: To-Do List With Emotions:
-- Component 1: Get Good GMAT Scores.
excitement, pressure Find out target scores for my school.
relief, comfort Enroll in prep class.
boredom, test anxiety Schedule time to study and do practice tests.
anxiety Take the GMAT.
Component 2: Write a Winning Personal Statement.
Brainstorming session.
Write first draft.
Find people to review give feedback.
Rewrite draft, repeat process.
1C. To-Do List With Emotions Example
Emotions: To-Do List With Emotions:
-- Component 1: Get Good GMAT Scores.
excitement, pressure Find out target scores for my school.
relief, comfort Enroll in prep class.
boredom, test anxiety Schedule time to study and do practice tests.
anxiety Take the GMAT.
-- Component 2: Write a Winning Personal Statement.
fun, exciting Brainstorming session.
embarassing, unconfident Write first draft.
vulnerable, judged Find people to review give feedback.
overwhelmed but optimistic Rewrite draft, repeat process.
1C. To-Do List With Emotions Example
Emotions: To-Do List With Emotions:
-- Component 1: Get Good GMAT Scores.
excitement, pressure Find out target scores for my school.
relief, comfort Enroll in prep class.
boredom, test anxiety Schedule time to study and do practice tests.
anxiety Take the GMAT.
-- Component 2: Write a Winning Personal Statement.
fun, exciting Brainstorming session.
embarassing, unconfident Write first draft.
vulnerable, judged Find people to review give feedback.
overwhelmed but optimistic Rewrite draft, repeat process.
SELF CARE PLAN:
Order my favorite pizza for study night!
SELF CARE PLAN:
Learn about a variety of test anxiety techniques.
SELF CARE PLAN:
Practice some free-writing exercising.
SELF CARE PLAN:
Look to supportive friend to be an ally.
o
o
o
o
scp-4
scp-4
1C. To-Do List With Emotions Homework
Practice To-Do List With Emotions!

Use the form on the next slide to practice this technique,
and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
1D. Mind Mapping

1D. Mind Mapping

  • An organized yet creative way of listing overactive worries.
  • Start with a central topic, connect related words and phrases as they come to you.
  • Keep going until nothing new comes to mind.
  • Reflect on your mind map, perhaps make sub-connections.
  • Allow you to see the background worries relating back to a larger task, which should bring self awareness and relief from stress.


1D. Mind Mapping Example
MBA
BACK TO SCHOOL
STATUS
EXCITEMENT
ECONOMY

INCREASED SECURITY
INCREASED RESPONSIBILITY
"It was rough!"


1D. Mind Mapping Example
MBA
BACK TO SCHOOL
STATUS
EXCITEMENT
ECONOMY

INCREASED SECURITY
INCREASED RESPONSIBILITY
"It was rough!"
mm-1
mm-2


Success!
You've completed the GAD section of the Anxiety Toolbox.

We welcome you to complete the GAD section homework for Worry Time, Zone of Control or To-Do List w/ Emotions to share during the FREE support group.

2. OCD (Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)

2. OCD
(Obsessive Compulsive Disorder)

  • Obsessive, invasive thoughts.
  • Compulsivity, inability to control habits or actions.
  • Symptoms occur for more than 2 months.
  • Obsessiveness and compulsivity are common traits in successful people, but can sometimes be damaging to well-being.
  • Even if not diagnosable, exhibiting traits of OCD can be helped with soothing techniques.


OCD Techniques

OCD Techniques


2A. Response Prevention

2A. Response Prevention

  • Actively stopping yourself from doing a compulsive action you know you do not need to do.
  • To interrupt this cycle, you must find a way to prevent the action from occuring.
  • Even if halted for only a brief time, this allows you to focus your energy and attention on more productive things.

2A. Response Prevention Example
Compulsion:

Checking phone every few
minutes for new texts/e-mails.

Response Prevention:
  • Give phone to a friend for 20 minutes.
  • Hide phone in a drawer for 20 minutes.

Frees your mental energy up to
focus on other things.

2A. Response Prevention Homework
Practice Response Prevention!

Use the following homework form to practice this technique,
and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
2B. Mental Shortlist

2B. Mental Shortlist

  • Method for halting obsessive remination, allows you to mp4e on.
  • In a calm state of mind, list items you can spend positive mental time on. Can really be anything beside your current obsession.
  • Refer to this list when obsessive thoughts creep into your mind. Think of them as healthy emotional snacks.
2B. Mental Shortlist Example
Obsessive Thought:

Obsessively thinking about
ex-boyfriend, stewing in negative
emotions from recent breakup.

Refer to Mental Shortlist:
  • Holiday shopping
  • Getaway/vacation with friends
  • 5 things I'm happy about
  • Brother's upcoming graduation
2C. Thought Replacement

2C. Thought Replacement

  • Helpful for replacing recurring, intrusive thoughts.
  • Depending on what your intrusive thought is, compose a phrase that specifically addresses and soothes the issue.
  • Have this healthy mantra handy when irrational, obsessive thoughts intrude your mind. It can be hard to recognize the need for this thought replacement in the throes of emotional surge.
  • Stay patient, persistent, and positive.
2C. Thought Replacement Example
Problem:

"My hands are dirty and
unhealthy, I must wash
them immediately."

Thought Replacement:

"My hands are clean and healthy, and further washing would be unhealthy."

2C. Thought Replacement Homework
Practice Thought Replacement!

Use the homework form on the following slide to practice this technique,
and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
Success!
You've completed the OCD section of the Anxiety Toolbox.

We welcome you to complete the OCD section homework for Response Prevention, or Thought Replacement to share during the FREE support group.

3. Panic Disorder

3. Panic Disorder

  • Sudden anxiety attacks.
  • Sweaty palms.
  • Heart palpitations.
  • Shortness of breath.
  • Important to make sure these symptoms are not due to an underlying medical condition.

Panic Disorder Techniques

Panic Disorder Techniques

3A. 3-Part Breath

  • Shallow breathing triggers 'fight or flight' reaction.
  • Release of 'fight or flight' hormones causes multiple symptoms of anxiety, but it all begins with breath.
  • Deliberately slow your inhale. Notice the breath first entering your belly, then your middle chest, then your upper chest.
  • String this together into one smooth flow of breath. Notice its effect on your body.
3A. Three Part Breath Example
Deep Breathing Example
Step One:
Fill your belly with your breath, notice your belly expanding and contracting as your breathe in and out.
Step Two:
Breathe into just your middle chest, where your ribs are, notice your ribs expanding horizontally.
Step Three:
Take a deep breath just into your upper chest, notice it rise vertically as you inhale there.
Step Four:
Slowly exhale, from the upper chest, to the middle, to your belly.
Step Five:
Repeat process above another 2-3 times.
Step Six:
Take notice of this breath pattern's effect ony our body and mind.
3B. Anchoring Statements

3B. Anchoring Statements

  • Pre-composed statement to repeat when you feel a panic attack coming on, or to reduce its intensity during and occurance.
  • During a panic attack, a sense of dread invades our otherwise logical mind. Use your anchoring statement to remind yourself that a panic attack is only a temporary state.
3B. Anchoring Statements Examples
Anchoring Statement Example
Example One:

"This may be uncomfortable but I will live through it."

Example Two:

"I've seen my doctor, I know that I'm healthy and my body can take care of this."

Example Three:

"I've experienced this before, and it always passes."


3B. Anchoring Statements Homeworkzone of
Practice Anchoring Statements!

Use the homework form on the next slide to practice this technique, and choose to share with a therapist at Carmichael Psychology
Success!
You've completed the Panic Disorder section of the Anxiety Toolbox.

We welcome you to complete the Panic Disorder section homework for Anchoring Statements to share during the FREE support group.

Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Is this something that I was born with or is this something that I learned from my family?
  • Am I going to feel this way forever?
  • What kind of therapy is best for me?
Thank You!
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Design and Art Direction for this presentation was provided by Caitlin Burns